Archive for: May, 2009

Snail eradication (day 23).

May 31 2009 Published by under Critters, Environment, Garden, Personal

Another overcast, cool, and dry morning today.

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One response so far

Snail eradication (day 22).

May 30 2009 Published by under Critters, Environment, Garden, Personal

This morning was overcast, cool, and dry.
But, as it wasn't a school day, I was determined to get some gastropod action.

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2 responses so far

Friday Sprog Blogging: science fair wrap-up.

May 29 2009 Published by under Chemistry, Kids and science

Since the school science fair is safely behind us, we can give you a peek at the projects the Free-Ride offspring presented. (We couldn't do this prior to the science fair without running the risk that the sprogs would be accused of lifting their projects from a blog post.)
Here's the elder Free-Ride offspring's project board (or at least the central panel of it):

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5 responses so far

Snail eradication (day 21).

May 29 2009 Published by under Critters, Environment, Garden, Personal

This morning was dry and cool and overcast, so the pickings were slim.

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3 responses so far

Ethics and the 'Oprah effect'.

May 28 2009 Published by under Communication, Ethics 101, Medicine, Pop culture

There's an interesting piece in the Chicago Tribune on the "Oprah effect". The upshot is that products or people who Oprah deigns to grace with airtime tend to find enormous public acceptance.
While this is well and good if the product is a novel or the person is a television chef, it's less clear that the Oprah effect is benign in the case of people without medical expertise offering medical advice.
From the article:

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8 responses so far

Candid Engineer on data handling and ethics.

In a recent post, Candid Engineer raised some interesting questions about data and ethics:

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13 responses so far

Trust and accountability in the vaccine-autism wars.

There's a new feature article by Liza Gross [1] up at PLoS Biology. Titled "A Broken Trust: Lessons from the Vaccine-Autism Wars," the article does a nice job illuminating how the themes of trust and accountability play out in interactions between researchers, physicians, patients, parents, journalists, and others in the public discourse about autism and vaccines. Ultimately, the events Gross examines -- and the ways the various participants react to those events -- underline the questions: Who can we trust for good information? and To whom are we accountable for our actions and our decisions? In many ways, it strikes me that the latter question needs more consideration than people typically give it.
The question of trust, on the other hand, is one with which people seem more ready to grapple. The challenge, however, is that such grappling seems more often than not to result in mistrust.

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27 responses so far

Snail eradication (day 20).

May 28 2009 Published by under Critters, Environment, Garden, Personal

Another morning, another gastropod foray.

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2 responses so far

News, both happy and wistful.

May 27 2009 Published by under Critters, Kids and science, Personal

The happy news and the wistful news concern separate matters, though.
First, the happy news:

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2 responses so far

3 Quarks Daily announces awards for science blogging.

May 27 2009 Published by under Announcements, Blogospheric science

Actually, the awards will include other sorts of blogging, too, but it's the awards for science blogging that have a fast-approaching nomination deadline.

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